Posts Tagged ‘LEED Gold’

On the Boards: 1100 Louisiana

Partnering with Hines and Page Southerland Page, G2LD is proud to be a member of the design team for downtown Houston high rise, 1100 Louisiana.

Tunnel Level Garage Elevator

Tunnel Level Garage Elevator

The extensive renovations encompass almost 30,000 square feet of public areas including the main street level lobby, elevator bays, and Starbucks area. On the tunnel level renovations include corridors, elevator lobbies, dining areas, and restrooms.

Main Lobby, Street Level

Main Lobby, Street Level

The design team selected new finishes and furnishings throughout the project and relied strongly on new lighting to give the space an updated signature look. Long, sleek lines of light were chosen throughout the space in the form of horizontal and vertical pendants, linear recessed fixtures, and wallwashing coves, for a clean look compatible with the modern lines of the building.

Tunnel to Garage Elevators

Tunnel to Garage Elevators

LED and fluorescent sources were used throughout the project allowing the design team to increase light levels substantially. At the same time the efficient sources create a low wattage per square foot, permitting the building to maintain its LEED Gold status.

Entrance to Garage Tunnel

Entrance to Garage Tunnel

Tunnel Level Tenant Elevator Lobby

Tunnel Level Tenant Elevator Lobby

Recently Completed: City of Houston Permitting Center

Gandy2 Lighting Design is pleased to announce the completion of the City of Houston’s Permitting Center. As a part of the design team led by Studio RED Architects, G2LD worked on the  lighting for the highly efficient renovation of a 200,000 sq. ft, 1920′s rice warehouse near downtown Houston. The building, which is on track to achieve LEED Gold, houses the majority of the City’s permitting activities as well as the Green Building Resource Center.

New exterior stair tower for the City of Houston Permitting Center

New exterior stair tower for the City of Houston Permitting Center

Above is one of two stair towers which were added to the original building. The architect wanted these to additions to glow at night and act as signage, making the building clearly visible to motorists passing on the nearby freeway overpass. In order to minimize the impact of light fixtures on the architectural design, G2LD used recessed step lights, mounted upside-down in the cast concrete wall, in order to uplight the horizontal planes. An energy efficient linear LED washes the walls with a very small fixture profile.

Exterior view of the City of Houston Permitting Center

Exterior view of the City of Houston Permitting Center

A view of the second exterior stair tower.

A view of the second exterior stair tower.

Interior lighting had to be extremely energy efficient as well as budget sensitive, but also had to aid in creating a bright and enjoyable atmosphere for City workers and visitors alike. The majority of fixtures throughout the space utilized High Output T5 fluorescent fixtures  with dual step ballasts, which allow occupants to choose higher or lower light levels without the costly expense of dimming ballasts throughout.

City of Houston Entry Lobby

City of Houston Entry Lobby

In addition, a daylight harvesting system was implemented for fixtures near the large windows, allowing the fixtures to dim and save electricity when there is ample sunlight to light the space.

Linear pendant fixtures throughout were chosen not only for their efficiency but also for their vintage look. The architect desired an industrial aesthetic in order to keep with the building’s warehouse heritage.

City of Houston Permitting Center Ground Floor Elevator Lobby

City of Houston Permitting Center Ground Floor Elevator Lobby

Basic fluorescent strip lights used as sconces provide a simple and economical way to mark elevator lobbies and other circulation paths while keeping with the vintage industrial look.

City of Houston Permitting Center Barcode Desk

City of Houston Permitting Center Bar Code Desk

City of Houston Permitting Center Barcode Desk--View 2

City of Houston Permitting Center Bar Code Desk--View 2

The ceiling above the main permitting desk is designed to create a series of bar codes using reclaimed wood timbers, various light fixtures, and raw steel. When viewed from below the bar codes translate into different words relating to the permitting process such as “sign” and “seal”.

The creative rehabilitation of this abandoned rice warehouse revitalized a building, a neighborhood, and stands as a symbol for a progressive direction for the City of Houston. G2LD is proud to have been a part of this team.

AIA Gala at the City of Houston Central Permitting Center

Viva Houston! That was the theme for this year’s AIA Gala which was held at the (still under construction) City of Houston Central Permitting Center. Loyal followers of G2LD will note that this event incorporated two projects near and dear to our hearts–the permitting center, which we have been working on with Studio Red Architects and the Gala itself, for which Sarah Gandy served on the environment committee.

A semi-completed construction site may not appeal to many groups for a Gala setting, but for architects, well, they feel right at home. Kudos to the Manhattan construction team for pulling together the space in time for the event! Just what every GC wants to hear–that 700+ design professionals will be having a throw-down on your construction site. The site made some amazing transformations in the days leading up to the party…

City of Houston Central Permitting Center main entrance 5 days before Gala

City of Houston Central Permitting Center main entrance 5 days before Gala

City of Houston Central Permitting Center main entrance during the Gala

City of Houston Central Permitting Center main entrance during the Gala

Piles of sand for the terrazzo floors dot the Gala site just days before the big event--luckily the lighting was in!

Piles of sand for the terrazzo floors dot the Gala site just days before the big event--luckily the lighting was in!

Gels provided by BriteStar Productions dimmed the new office lights to a pleasing party-friendly amber hue. Floors are in. Bar is set up--ready for the crowds!

Gels provided by BriteStar Productions dimmed the new office lights to a pleasing party-friendly amber hue. Floors are in. Bar is set up--ready for the crowds!

Mayor Anise Parker spoke at the Gala highlighting the City’s commitment to green building and public art, both of which will be highlighted extensively in the “new” building (for those just now tuning in, it’s actually a renovated 1926 rice warehouse slated to achieve LEED Gold). Great speach and pat on the back for all involved and, may I say, I think the black and white video projection looked great in the industrial space…

Mayor Anise Parker addresses the 700+ crowd at the AIA Gala

Mayor Anise Parker addresses the 700+ crowd at the AIA Gala

Thanks to Mary Margaret Hansen, the lead artist for the COH project, for sharing her photos with us. The whole project will be peppered with very cool public art projects and you can follow Mary Margaret’s blog about the process and the artists here.

Artist Mary Margaret Hansen, Lance and Sarah Gandy visiting at the AIA Gala

Artist Mary Margaret Hansen, Lance and Sarah Gandy visiting at the AIA Gala

A great time was had by all. Looking forward to next year AND seeing the finished building!

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INFORMATION

Quite simply, no piece of architecture could function without light, whether electric or natural. Light defines the way in which we see architecture—the forms and volumes, the entryways, circulation and gathering spaces, the carefully chosen colors and textures—all of these can read drastically differently under different lighting conditions. And of course without any light, they become invisible. Lighting is a key element in defining a space and should be treated as such.