Posts Tagged ‘exterior lighting’

Discovery Green Brown Promenade

Gandy² Lighting Design is proud to announce the completion of Discovery Green’s Brown Promenade.

Discovery Green Brown Promenade

View down the recently illuminated Brown Promenade at Houston’s Discovery Green

Originally illuminated only by pathway bollards, the park’s Board of Directors wished to highlight the Promenade’s impressive alley of mature oak trees, and entrusted G2LD to design the lighting for the over-600 foot esplanade. With maintenance and existing ground cover being two concerns for the lighting, our team designed a custom one foot tall bollard to be cast on site that would house each LED ingrade fixture. This slight elevation allows the fixture to be level with the existing landscape without being an eyesore or glare source to passing pedestrians.

 

Discovery Green's Brown Promenade

Mature Live Oak trees are uplit with new LED fixtures along Brown Promenade at Houston’s Discovery Green

The result is both energy efficient and maintenance friendly while dramatically illuminating one of Houston’s most iconic promenades.

 

Brown Promenade at Discovery Green

Mature Live Oak trees are uplit with new LED fixtures along Brown Promenade at Houston’s Discovery Green. Adjacent, and with this spectacular view, is the popular restaurant, The Grove.

On the Boards: Allen Parkway Improvements

Gandy² Lighting Design is proud to be a design team member of the Allen Parkway Improvements Project, which seeks to increase beauty, safety and functionality of Allen Parkway between Dunlavy Street and Downtown Houston.

Proposed Allen Parkway Improvements with new lighting

Proposed Allen Parkway Improvements with new lighting

Working in conjunction with the City of Houston, the Downtown Redevelopment Authority, Walter P. Moore and SWA Group, G2LD designed the lighting along this important stretch to enhance the four main project goals: improving public safety, improving access to neighborhoods south of the parkway, providing vehicular parking for the adjacent Buffalo Bayou Park, and creating a scenic bayou drive.

Map showing extent of project from Dunlavy St. to Downtown Houston

Map showing extent of project from Dunlavy St. to Downtown Houston

A change in speed limits as well as the addition of new traffic signals, new parking areas, and pedestrian crossings, made it important to readdress the lighting along this roadway. G2LD carefully designed the lighting specifications and layouts in order to meet the most stringent requirements for light levels and uniformity ratios, while minimizing glare to drivers and park users alike.

Current view of Allen Parkway at Taft

Current view of Allen Parkway at Taft

Proposed redesign of Allen Parkway at Taft

Proposed redesign of Allen Parkway at Taft, featuring enhanced landscaping and treescapes as well as parking areas for the users of Buffalo Bayou Park. New LED lighting addresses all of these changes.

Existing view of downtown from Allen Parkway

Existing view of downtown from Allen Parkway

Proposed view of Downtown Houston from Allen Parkway.

Proposed view of downtown from Allen Parkway. New street lighting addresses all of the proposed changes including new landscaping, changes in lanes and traffic signals, new speed limits, and new parking areas for park users.

Recently Completed: City of Houston Permitting Center

Gandy2 Lighting Design is pleased to announce the completion of the City of Houston’s Permitting Center. As a part of the design team led by Studio RED Architects, G2LD worked on the  lighting for the highly efficient renovation of a 200,000 sq. ft, 1920′s rice warehouse near downtown Houston. The building, which is on track to achieve LEED Gold, houses the majority of the City’s permitting activities as well as the Green Building Resource Center.

New exterior stair tower for the City of Houston Permitting Center

New exterior stair tower for the City of Houston Permitting Center

Above is one of two stair towers which were added to the original building. The architect wanted these to additions to glow at night and act as signage, making the building clearly visible to motorists passing on the nearby freeway overpass. In order to minimize the impact of light fixtures on the architectural design, G2LD used recessed step lights, mounted upside-down in the cast concrete wall, in order to uplight the horizontal planes. An energy efficient linear LED washes the walls with a very small fixture profile.

Exterior view of the City of Houston Permitting Center

Exterior view of the City of Houston Permitting Center

A view of the second exterior stair tower.

A view of the second exterior stair tower.

Interior lighting had to be extremely energy efficient as well as budget sensitive, but also had to aid in creating a bright and enjoyable atmosphere for City workers and visitors alike. The majority of fixtures throughout the space utilized High Output T5 fluorescent fixtures  with dual step ballasts, which allow occupants to choose higher or lower light levels without the costly expense of dimming ballasts throughout.

City of Houston Entry Lobby

City of Houston Entry Lobby

In addition, a daylight harvesting system was implemented for fixtures near the large windows, allowing the fixtures to dim and save electricity when there is ample sunlight to light the space.

Linear pendant fixtures throughout were chosen not only for their efficiency but also for their vintage look. The architect desired an industrial aesthetic in order to keep with the building’s warehouse heritage.

City of Houston Permitting Center Ground Floor Elevator Lobby

City of Houston Permitting Center Ground Floor Elevator Lobby

Basic fluorescent strip lights used as sconces provide a simple and economical way to mark elevator lobbies and other circulation paths while keeping with the vintage industrial look.

City of Houston Permitting Center Barcode Desk

City of Houston Permitting Center Bar Code Desk

City of Houston Permitting Center Barcode Desk--View 2

City of Houston Permitting Center Bar Code Desk--View 2

The ceiling above the main permitting desk is designed to create a series of bar codes using reclaimed wood timbers, various light fixtures, and raw steel. When viewed from below the bar codes translate into different words relating to the permitting process such as “sign” and “seal”.

The creative rehabilitation of this abandoned rice warehouse revitalized a building, a neighborhood, and stands as a symbol for a progressive direction for the City of Houston. G2LD is proud to have been a part of this team.

Recently Completed–Dickinson First United Methodist Church Exterior

G2LD is proud to announce the completion of the exterior facade lighting for Dickinson First United Methodist Church. The congregation desired a strong presence in the community, so that the building would serve as a beacon even at night.

Dickinson First United Methodist Exterior

Dickinson First United Methodist Exterior

The team at G2LD chose energy efficient and long life sources such as fluorescent and ceramic metal halide in order to reduce the maintenance and energy costs for the church. Fixtures mounted close to the building allow the light sources to graze the stone areas of the facade, showcasing the texture and color.

Dickinson First United Methodist Chirch Exterior

Dickinson First United Methodist Church Exterior

Select interior Sanctuary lights were put on an astronomical timeclock so that they would come on in conjunction with the exterior lights. This allows the extensive stained glass windows to glow at night, enhancing the exterior beauty.

Dickinson First United Methodist Church

Dickinson First United Methodist Church

All fixtures were chosen in a size and color so as to be as unobtrusive on the facade as possible, minimizing architectural intrusion. Custom mounting details allowed small, efficient fixtures to wash the steeple in light without having to mount to or penetrate the roof surface. The result is a church that is a beacon for the surrounding community.

Return top

INFORMATION

Quite simply, no piece of architecture could function without light, whether electric or natural. Light defines the way in which we see architecture—the forms and volumes, the entryways, circulation and gathering spaces, the carefully chosen colors and textures—all of these can read drastically differently under different lighting conditions. And of course without any light, they become invisible. Lighting is a key element in defining a space and should be treated as such.